4931

A parallel accelerator for semantic search

Abhinandan Majumdar, Srihari Cadambi, Srimat T. Chakradhar, Hans Peter Graf
NEC Laboratories America, Inc., Princeton, NJ, USA
IEEE 9th Symposium on Application Specific Processors (SASP), 2011

@inproceedings{majumdar2011parallel,

   title={A parallel accelerator for semantic search},

   author={Majumdar, A. and Cadambi, S. and Chakradhar, S.T. and Graf, H.P.},

   booktitle={Application Specific Processors (SASP), 2011 IEEE 9th Symposium on},

   pages={122–128},

   organization={IEEE}

}

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Semantic text analysis is a technique used in advertisement placement, cognitive databases and search engines. With increasing amounts of data and stringent response-time requirements, improving the underlying implementation of semantic analysis becomes critical. To this end, we look at Supervised Semantic Indexing (SSI), a recently proposed algorithm for semantic analysis. SSI ranks a large number of documents based on their semantic similarity to a text query. For each query, it computes millions of dot products on unstructured data, generates a large intermediate result, and then performs ranking. SSI underperforms on both state-of-the-art multi-cores as well as GPUs. Its performance scalability on multi-cores is hampered by their limited support for fine-grained data parallelism. GPUs, though beat multi-cores by running thousands of threads, cannot handle large intermediate data because of their small on-chip memory. Motivated by this, we present an FPGA-based hardware accelerator for semantic analysis. As a key feature, the accelerator combines hundreds of simple processing elements together with in-memory processing to simultaneously generate and process (consume) the large intermediate data. It also supports "dynamic parallelism" – a feature that configures the PEs differently for full utilization of the available processin logic after the FPGA is programmed. Our FPGA prototype is 10-13x faster than a 2.5 GHz quad-core Xeon, and 1.5-5x faster than a 240 core 1.3 GHz Tesla GPU, despite operating at a modest frequency of 125 MHz.
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